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Intel Next-Gen CPU Has Memory Controller and GPU – CPUFreak91

CPUFreak91

Member

Posts: 2337
From:
Registered: 02-01-2005
quote:
Many readers wrote in with news of Intel's revelations yesterday about its upcoming Penryn and Nehalem cores. Information has been trickling out about Penryn, but the big news concerns Nehalem the "tock" to Penryn's "tick." Nehalem will be a scalable architecture with some products having on-board memory controller, "on-package" GPU, and up to 16 threads per chip. From Ars Technica's coverage: "...Intel's Pat Gelsinger also made a number of high-level disclosures about the successor to Penryn, the 45nm Nehalem core. Unlike Penryn, which is a shrink/derivative of Core 2 Duo (Merom), Nehalem is architected from the ground up for 45nm. This is a major new design, and Gelsinger revealed some truly tantalizing details about it. Nehalem has its roots in the four-issue Core 2 Duo architecture, but the direction that it will take Intel is apparent in Gelsinger's insistence that, 'we view Nehalem as the first true dynamically scalable microarchitecture.' What Gelsinger means by this is that Nehalem is not only designed to take Intel up to eight cores on a single die, but those cores are meant to be mixed and matched with varied amounts of cache and different features in order to produce processors that are tailored to specific market segments." More details, including Intel's slideware, appear at PC Perspectives and HotHardware.

http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/105147911/article.pl

I guess Moore's law isn't such an issue any more. When you hit the limit... add another core

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bennythebear

Member

Posts: 1225
From: kentucky,usa
Registered: 12-13-2003
wow...i'm still wishing i had a dual core cpu to use...whenever i they have 32 core cpu i might have a quad core.

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Matt Langley
Member

Posts: 247
From: Eugene, OR, USA
Registered: 08-31-2006
The other day we just had an Intel Threading bootcamp here at GG in which Buzzmonkey and Pipeworks (two other local game dev companies) attended as well. The Intel guys talked heavily about how games and game engines can take advantage and utilize multiple core processors while also displaying the very real and very large challenges the game development industry has in doing so.

Multiple core processors will effect games quite a bit, though I wouldn't hold your breath before they dramatically effect gaming on a general scale. Unfortunately the nature of games makes it more difficult to take advantage of multiple cores (though don't take this in meaning they won't effect gaming, just not as much as other uses of a computer).

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Matthew Langley
Lead Documentation Engineer
GarageGames

HanClinto

Administrator

Posts: 1828
From: Indiana
Registered: 10-11-2004
quote:
Originally posted by Matt Langley:
The other day we just had an Intel Threading bootcamp here at GG in which Buzzmonkey and Pipeworks (two other local game dev companies) attended as well. The Intel guys talked heavily about how games and game engines can take advantage and utilize multiple core processors while also displaying the very real and very large challenges the game development industry has in doing so.

Wow! Matt, that sounds incredibly interesting. I'm really impressed that Intel took time to do that -- I assume that this was an event that Intel sponsored, in order to try and get more game developers on board with multicore development? I think it's seriously cool that they gave you guys a class on that stuff.

From your second paragraph, it sounds like you don't anticipate Torque making full use multi-core processors any time soon -- even just thinking about it myself, I'm not sure what could be utilized with dual core in Torque. I guess Torque already has a nice division created between client and server, perhaps that would be a good line to split Torque into running on two cores (so splitting on an organizational line, rather than on a functional line, such as networking/graphics). I really don't know though.

Matt Langley
Member

Posts: 247
From: Eugene, OR, USA
Registered: 08-31-2006
quote:
Wow! Matt, that sounds incredibly interesting. I'm really impressed that Intel took time to do that -- I assume that this was an event that Intel sponsored, in order to try and get more game developers on board with multicore development? I think it's seriously cool that they gave you guys a class on that stuff.

Yeah, Intel is very proactive about getting game developers and game engine developers to utilizing multicore processors. Which makes sense, so they have added value to their current and upcoming products. They brought in two quad-core machines for the demonstrations.

quote:
From your second paragraph, it sounds like you don't anticipate Torque making full use multi-core processors any time soon -- even just thinking about it myself, I'm not sure what could be utilized with dual core in Torque. I guess Torque already has a nice division created between client and server, perhaps that would be a good line to split Torque into running on two cores (so splitting on an organizational line, rather than on a functional line, such as networking/graphics). I really don't know though.

You hit the nail right on the head. We definitely are interested in ways to take advantage of multi-threading (and multi-core support, which goes hand in hand). Though one of the main points of the presentation was that a good, multi-threaded solution for game technology that is scalable and efficient is very very hard. Though what we also learned is there are some easy methods to take advantage of it in minor ways. These ways won't scale when quad core becomes popular (or any n core value), though it does add advantage to the current dual core setups that are becoming more prevalent.

Unfortunately us being in the engine dev market it makes finding a good solution tricky. Especially since the test cases they showed us (some major games and game tech) they customized it to take advantage of the individual games needs. Since we sell an engine that we semi-market as a general use engine it makes it hard to get one implementation that works for everything.

Also, as you brought up, our engines being very networking centric makes this even trickier. Since the biggest issue with multi-threading is synchronization. Some things you just can't realistically split up and send off to be done 'sometime'... which makes it tricky with Torque since certain aspects need to be done in a certain order for the networking. Of course rendering is the big block that no one has effectively multi-threaded and the impression we got was it probably will not be, then again you never know.

In any case it was very educational and interesting. If we go for an approach we will definitely be better off now. Intel is also very proactive about giving assistance to games and game engines that utilize this tech.

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Matthew Langley
Lead Documentation Engineer
GarageGames

jestermax

Member

Posts: 1064
From: Ontario, Canada
Registered: 06-21-2006
On the subject of multi-processing, does anyone have any experience with OpenMP? (Open Multi-Processing)

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