General Discussions

StarForce copy protection damages hardware? – Ashton_JX

Ashton_JX

Member

Posts: 156
From: Springfield, Oregon, USA
Registered: 02-21-2005
I just read that a popular copy protection software, Star Force can make optical drive preformance deteriorate and even possibly do permanent damage to some optical drives over time. Also, I read that the software leaves holes in a system's security.

More info available at the links here:

http://www.glop.org/starforce/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/StarForce

Definately something I wouldn't want on my system. I actually found that a FREEWARE game I downloaded from the net, TrackMania Nations actually came with this software. Whats up with that? I didn't buy anything, why inflict me with this copy protection stuff? >

I guess it is just kind of leftover from the game's commercial counterparts, as Nations uses the same engine as the commercial games. Still, I'm kind of disturbed about the idea that my optical drives might be getting some wear because of this.

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1 Corinthians 15:58 So, my dear brothers and sisters, be strong and steady, always enthusiastic about the Lordís work, for you know that nothing you do for the Lord is ever useless. (NLT)

Tired of loosing your work for all eternity? Jesus Saves! You should too :P (liek every 1 1/2 seconds) This is a message from teh save the data foundation, and from (CTRL + S): Because da data is y00r future. Maybe.

steveth45

Member

Posts: 536
From: Eugene, OR, USA
Registered: 08-10-2005
Yeah,
You have to be careful with the music CD's you buy at stores, too. There are those copyprotected CD's that freeze Macs, and then the ones that Sony shipped with the rootkit that compromises your computer's security. It's typical for companies and corporations to overstep their boundaries to protect against piracy. It sounds like the StarForce protection violates your fair use rights. If you buy a bit of software, it is legal and advisable to make a copy in case the first one gets damaged. If you can't run from the copy, then you may have to do something mildly devious, like troll the internet for cracks or cracked versions of the software you already bought. I think registration codes printed on the inside of a box or CD is a much better solution for software.

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buddboy

Member

Posts: 2220
From: New Albany, Indiana, U.S.
Registered: 10-08-2004
yah, that happened to me. i owned the legitimate software, but i had to get a crack cuz i couldn't run my favorite game... lol. cuz i lost the key =(

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WARNING:

RADIOACTIVE IE AHEAD!
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#include <spazz.h>

int name()
{
char name['B','u','d','d','B','o''y']

[This message has been edited by buddboy (edited June 24, 2006).]

Ashton_JX

Member

Posts: 156
From: Springfield, Oregon, USA
Registered: 02-21-2005
Ouch! I may have to search for some removal tools. Like, every CD I get I just transfer it to my pc and don't bother any more with the disks really. I'm not sure how much Sony disks I have (maybe none?). I'll have to find out :P.

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1 Corinthians 15:58 So, my dear brothers and sisters, be strong and steady, always enthusiastic about the Lordís work, for you know that nothing you do for the Lord is ever useless. (NLT)

Tired of loosing your work for all eternity? Jesus Saves! You should too :P (liek every 1 1/2 seconds) This is a message from teh save the data foundation, and from (CTRL + S): Because da data is y00r future. Maybe.